Cummings essay poet

It has frequently been remarked, about my own writings, that I emphasize the notion of attention. This began simply enough: to see that the way the flicker flies is greatly different from the way the swallow plays in the golden air of summer. It was my pleasure to notice such things, it was a good first step. But later, watching M. when she was taking photographs, and watching her in the darkroom, and no less watching the intensity and openness with which she dealt with friends, and strangers too, taught me what real attention is about. Attention without feeling, I began to learn, is only a report. An openness — an empathy — was necessary if the attention was to matter. Such openness and empathy M. had in abundance, and gave away freely… I was in my late twenties and early thirties, and well filled with a sense of my own thoughts, my own presence. I was eager to address the world of words — to address the world with words. Then M. instilled in me this deeper level of looking and working, of seeing through the heavenly visibles to the heavenly invisibles. I think of this always when I look at her photographs, the images of vitality, hopefulness, endurance, kindness, vulnerability… We each had our separate natures; yet our ideas, our influences upon each other became a rich and abiding confluence.

The chief device of ancient Hebrew Biblical poetry , including many of the psalms , was parallelism , a rhetorical structure in which successive lines reflected each other in grammatical structure, sound structure, notional content, or all three. Parallelism lent itself to antiphonal or call-and-response performance, which could also be reinforced by intonation . Thus, Biblical poetry relies much less on metrical feet to create rhythm, but instead creates rhythm based on much larger sound units of lines, phrases and sentences. [40] Some classical poetry forms, such as Venpa of the Tamil language , had rigid grammars (to the point that they could be expressed as a context-free grammar ) which ensured a rhythm. [41] In Chinese poetry , tones as well as stresses create rhythm. Classical Chinese poetics identifies four tones : the level tone, rising tone, departing tone, and entering tone . [42]

In analyzing the poem, Robert DiYanni notes that the image of a single falling leaf is a common symbol for loneliness , and that this sense of loneliness is enhanced by the structure of the poem. He writes that the fragmentation of the words "illustrates visually the separation that is the primary cause of loneliness". The fragmentation of the word loneliness is especially significant, since it highlights the fact that that word contains the word one . In addition, the isolated letter l can initially appear to be the numeral one. It creates the effect that the leaf is still one, or "oneliness" whole within itself, even after it is isolated from the tree. [4] Robert Scott Root-Bernstein observes that the overall shape of the poem resembles a 1. [5]

Ammons’s concerns with the transcendental everyman coalesce in what may prove to be his finest effort: the National Book Award winner of 1993, Garbage. The title, suggested when Ammons drove by a Florida landfill, is characteristically flippant and yet perfectly serious. “ Garbage is a brilliant book,” said David Baker in the Kenyon Review. “It may very well be a great one... perhaps even superior to his previous long masterwork, Tape for the Turn of the Year. ” Once again evoking an Emersonian view of nature, Baker noted, “Ammons discovers that nature everywhere is composed of the decadent and entropic, the aged, the tired,” and also shows that matter transforms and renews itself, turning “garbage into utility, decay into new life.” As Robert B. Shaw pointed out in Poetry, however, Ammons’s transcendent meditations are always seasoned with “jokes, slang, ironies, Li’l Abnerisms.”

Cummings essay poet

cummings essay poet

Ammons’s concerns with the transcendental everyman coalesce in what may prove to be his finest effort: the National Book Award winner of 1993, Garbage. The title, suggested when Ammons drove by a Florida landfill, is characteristically flippant and yet perfectly serious. “ Garbage is a brilliant book,” said David Baker in the Kenyon Review. “It may very well be a great one. ... perhaps even superior to his previous long masterwork, Tape for the Turn of the Year. ” Once again evoking an Emersonian view of nature, Baker noted, “Ammons discovers that nature everywhere is composed of the decadent and entropic, the aged, the tired,” and also shows that matter transforms and renews itself, turning “garbage into utility, decay into new life.” As Robert B. Shaw pointed out in Poetry, however, Ammons’s transcendent meditations are always seasoned with “jokes, slang, ironies, Li’l Abnerisms.”

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