The waning of materialism new essays

Oliver and Barnes note their “waning optimism” since the first edition, which outlined hope for the future of the disability rights movement. While they note these challenges and offer “little prospect of transforming capitalism in the foreseeable future,” they conclude, “We still believe that the only long-term political strategy for disabled people is to be part of a far wider struggle to create a better society for all.” They foresee an end to disability oppression only “when the oppression of all is overcome and that will only happen with major structural, economic, political, and cultural transformation as well as resistance.”

Total FAIL. The author entirely misses the point. We do not need an emotional “revival.” The change does not come from the people- it COMES FROM THE BISHOPS. They have a Teaching Chair that they do not use. The early Church was a community of disciples, and not just plain old devotees. Jesus mandated the Church to MAKE DISCIPLES, not devotees. The problem is that discipleship is demanding (Luke 14:33), and that if Bishops reimplemented DISCIPLESHIP, most devotees would leave. Its been a long time since “The Church” has ceased to be “The Church.” In fact, we all adhere to a religion that is foreign to the religion of our Teacher, Lord Jesus Christ.

The waning of materialism new essays

the waning of materialism new essays

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